dcsimg
POLICE EMPLOYMENT
Criminal Justice Colleges By State
More [+]
Hide [ - ]

Forensic Psychology Schools & Degree Programs

Forensic psychologists are licensed psychologists who primarily assist the criminal justice system by evaluating and assessing suspects and defendants in criminal cases. Many forensic psychologists serve as expert witnesses for both prosecutors and defense attorneys. Courts with jurisdiction over juveniles commonly use the services provided in forensic psychology. The most well-known job of the forensic psychologist is determining and testifying about the mental competency of a defendant to stand trial. The word "forensic" means "pertaining to the law" and essentially sets the parameters of the duties of the forensic psychologist.

Forensic Psychology

Forensic Psychologist Education Requirements

Practice as an independent forensic psychologist typically requires a master's or PhD degree in psychology or a closely related field. The master's degree requires at least an additional year or two of study after earning a bachelor's degree. A PhD typically involves five years of full-time graduate schooling and a completed dissertation based on students' original research.

Forensic psychology schools include traditional colleges and universities, and some students earn a forensic psychology degree online. An online forensic psychology degree can be earned from home with little required classroom time, although internships or clinical experience may be required.

Forensic psychologist degrees typically include the following coursework:

  • Abnormal psychology and related studies
  • Mathematics
  • Law and legal issues
  • Communication skills
  • Biology and human anatomy

Licensure of Forensic Psychologists

All states require licensure for forensic psychologist. Licensing requirements vary from state to state. Application for licensure must be made to the state's licensing board.

Job Prospects & Salary for Forensic Psychologists

Psychologists earned a mean annual wage of $84,220 in 2009, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Wages vary from one state to another, with the highest salaries typically occurring in large urban centers. Many forensic psychologists are self-employed and work on a contractual basis with court systems and defense attorneys. Employment prospects for forensic psychologists are about the same as for other occupations.

Forensic psychologists are licensed psychologists who primarily assist the criminal justice system by evaluating and assessing suspects and defendants in criminal cases. Many forensic psychologists serve as expert witnesses for both prosecutors and defense attorneys. Courts with jurisdiction over juveniles commonly use the services provided in forensic psychology. The most well-known job of the forensic psychologist is determining and testifying about the mental competency of a defendant to stand trial. The word "forensic" means "pertaining to the law" and essentially sets the parameters of the duties of the forensic psychologist.

Forensic Psychology Degree Requirements

Practice as an independent forensic psychologist typically requires a master's or PhD degree in psychology or a closely related field. The master's degree requires at least an additional year or two of study after earning a bachelor's degree. A PhD typically involves five years of full-time graduate schooling and a completed dissertation based on students' original research.

Forensic psychology schools include traditional colleges and universities, and some students earn a forensic psychology degree online. An online forensic psychology degree can be earned from home with little required classroom time, although internships or clinical experience may be required.

Forensic psychologist degrees typically include the following coursework:

  • Abnormal psychology and related studies
  • Mathematics
  • Law and legal issues
  • Communication skills
  • Biology and human anatomy

Licensure of Forensic Psychologists

All states require licensure for forensic psychologist. Licensing requirements vary from state to state. Application for licensure must be made to the state's licensing board.

Job Prospects for Forensic Psychologists

Psychologists earned a mean annual wage of $84,220 in 2009, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Wages vary from one state to another, with the highest salaries typically occurring in large urban centers. Many forensic psychologists are self-employed and work on a contractual basis with court systems and defense attorneys. Employment prospects for forensic psychologists are about the same as for other occupations.

X
Check Out These Schools Too
Sponsored

Forensic Psychology Schools


Program:
Degree:
ZIP:
Browse federal, state & local police jobs across the country.
Go